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? >> just one. mr. king, if you can hear me, i was wondering if there's anything that the unions can actually do to deprive some of the nonpaying members from the rights you're able to put together. is there anything you can do as an incentive or leverage to get people to pay if this measure goes through? >> again, the vast majority of our members in right to work states now, a huge majority, do pay their dues. they want to be part of the union. it's just that this is an attack because we herped elect president obama, because we stand up for working people. >> but the question, mr. king -- >> we're not going to allow that to happen. >> are there any measures you can actually take against those that decide to opt out of paying of being a part of your union, that perhaps they won't receive some of the benefits of -- >> you know, honestly, honestly, i'm not interested in excising leverage. we do a great job. we think the great job we do, members will continue to -- the vast majority, 98, 99% will continue to pay their union dues. but we have to understand this. this is part of a nationa
to go on. nicole: we are trend mr. king a little higher, not far off of the line, like apple has been lower and back in the green and helping the tech heavy nasdaq shows in green arrows and been under significant pressure. dow jones industrials crossing the unchanged line again and again, worries about fiscal cliff tomorrow is the all-important jobs report. right now you see the dow up fractionally, up about 10 points. that is the latest on the floor of the stock exchange. was going on at the cme? phil: the day after the biggest gasoline inventory build in 15 years gasoline futures are up, trading close to 0 one month low. they're under a lot fresher this morning not only from that massive amount of supply but the comments out of the ecb and mario draghi. the good news is retail gasoline prices just in time for the holidays should be coming down dramatically. we are here in some areas where they could drop as much as $0.30. if you look at other markets it is not all good news. we are seeing a lot of nervousness in the gold and silver. to my favorite straight shooter, sandra smith. san
. >> thank you. >> good luck to you. mr. mark king. >>> coming up -- alzheimer's, a devastating disease, now it is silencing the voice of a music legend. glen campbell talks about the end of a long career, that's next. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. it's called passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. so does aarp, serving americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp dicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it helps cover some of what medicare doesn't pay. to find out more, call today. ♪ like a rhinestone cowboy >>> ah, truly an american music legend. he has called it a career. glen campbell played the final show of his i lustrous career last night in napa, california. he is suffering from al alzheimer's. he sat down with cnn's miguel marquez. >> reporter: last year, the rhinestone cowboy made a stunning announcement. >> what they diagnose me as? >> alzheimer's. what's alzheim
to a friend and colleague, the gentleman from iowa, mr. king. mr. king: i thank the gentleman from georgia for yielding and for leading this special order to honor jay pearson. i'm sitting here and i'm glad i had the opportunity to here other members to talk about jay pearson and i wonder how do i make sense of this. 34 years. 34 years ago there was a lady that opened up a convenience store in a town in my district. she gave knowledge and if you want to though when a mayor ran or why there isn't a parking meter or stop light in the town, you could ask her and she would know. who is working in what field, she'll know. same thing here. one person who knows the house of representatives, that understands it, and knows the history, has lived it and one thing to catch up with things, but another to feel it in your instinct and in your gut. jay has all of that. and he has had to listen to me and for that i come to the floor and apologize night after night after night. i couldn't have done that without your excellent help. and mr. speaker, jay would correct me and say, i need to address you, mr. s
is express their discontent. we talked to mr. king with the united auto workers. he said what they're out here to do is take a stand against injustice. i heard a short time ago from the incoming leader of the democratic party, who said all they can really do is make their voices heard. >> now it's official. ladies and gentlemen, the governor of michigan is one greedy nerd and he is one weak geek. and we're not going to take it anymore. he wasn't satisfied with outsourcing thousands of jobs to low wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low-wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: as you look at state troopers out here right now, some are equipped with batons. look at their hips. what they have on their hips there are gas masks. you can see some weapons they're carrying. nonlethal weapons that would be used to dispurse the tear gas if it was needed to. as we bring up we heard someone shouting in the background it has been a peaceful demonstration. it has. there was trouble on the first day. eight people were arrested. a little
of the nominated books. "the boy kings of texas. " a memoir. domingo martinez is the awe their. mr. martinez now joins us here on the red carpet. this is your story. is that correct? >> it's primarily my story but it's also the story of my family. i go back one generation more and discuss my grandmother's mythology, how she came over to america, and how ultimately her coming across from mexico into america, that sort of spawned this fantastic first generation american story. >> mr. martinez, you were raised in brownsville, texas, right on the border, what was it like during your childhood? >> back then i experienced it as being racially polarized, in a more economic sort of striation, and was very agriculturally based. my parents ran a trucking business that sort of -- basically farm laborers, so kind of a conflicted experience because we would go to school and pretend like we were wealthier than we were, and entirely different, the people who we really are or were, and then we would go home and it was a completely untraditional lifestyle as farm laborers, my brother and myself. my sisters had a
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6